Sunday, August 18, 2019

Vancouver B.C. No.12-14

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, August 2017.

Friday, August 16, 2019

Steveston B.C. #11A-3

Steveston, British Columbia, Canada, August 2017.

Thursday, August 15, 2019

New Light Through Old Lenses

Nikon D850 with the rapid rectilinear lens about 150mm ƒ4 made by Bausch and Lomb Optical Company.

I decided to play the mad photographic scientist and make some Frankenstein like adapters to try out some old brass camera lenses that I had in my collection. I'm certainly not the first time a photographer to stick an old brass lens on a modern-day digital camera but I thought it would be fun to try. A hundred years ago many camera lenses were made of brass and had no optical coatings on the glass elements. I had 2 old lenses I wanted to try out that I thought might work.

The first lens is a rapid rectilinear lens about 150mm ƒ4 made by Bausch and Lomb Optical Company, it's set in a Kodak automatic shutter. The lens was attached to a No. 3 Cartridge Kodak Camera that was manufactured by the Eastman Kodak Company from 1900 to 1907. I acquired this camera along with a number of other old cameras about 5 years ago.

The second lens I had is an old Beck Symmetrical lens about 250mm ƒ8 that I have owned for about 40 years or more, it has no shutter and the aperture blades are long gone. I made some drop-in waterhouse stops. The Beck lens manufacturing company has been around since the 1850s They were a British optical manufacturing company based in London UK and produced a wide range of optical products: microscopes, telescopes, eye test glasses for opticians (optometer lenses), other optical equipment, including camera lenses and cameras.

Since I had no way to focus the lenses I used a close-up focusing bellows attachment. I also needed some kind of adapter to mount the lenses on to the bellows which was made for a Nikon camera. I didn't want to spend a lot of money as I was not too sure how it might work, so found some cheap stuff on Amazon. I was able to screw the Beck lens right into the M42 to Nikon adapter which I thought was pretty amazing. For the Bausch and Lomb lens I had to do a bit more figuring out as the lens flange is much smaller, luckily I had some small screws and I was able to drill some holes in the lens adapter using parts of the old Kodak camera, in the end, it ended up holding the lens in place.

I only put this together recently and have included a couple "test" photos. I will try and photograph some other subjects to see what use I can practically make from them. So far they look not too bad for lenses about to hit the 120-year-old mark. Of course quite soft at wide-open apertures they do seem to improve in sharpness stopped down with a smaller aperture. Perhaps the interesting way to use them is to use them wide open or stopped down just a little to try and capture a softer look to the photograph.

There you have it old meets new and is new once again.



Yellow daisies (No. 254) Nikon D850 on tripod with the rapid rectilinear lens, stopped down to about ƒ16, 1/2 second. 


 
Yellow daisies (No. 255) Nikon D850 on tripod with the rapid rectilinear lens, wide open at ƒ4, 1/15th second. 


  Nikon D850 with the Beck Symmetrical lens about 250mm ƒ8. 


  Yellow daisies (No. 253) Nikon D850 on tripod with the Beck Symmetrical lens, wide open at ƒ8, 1/20th second.

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Steveston B.C. #11A-2

Steveston, British Columbia, Canada, August 2017.

Monday, August 12, 2019

Steveston B.C. #10-13

Steveston, British Columbia, Canada, August 2017.

Saturday, August 10, 2019

Steveston B.C. #10-11

Steveston, British Columbia, Canada, August 2017.

Thursday, August 08, 2019

Steveston B.C. #10-9

Steveston, British Columbia, Canada, August 2017.